Wodify –> ZenPlanner

As many of you already know from the announcement on our private Facebook page, we are switching from Wodify to ZenPlanner for our gym software. We are very excited about this switch for many reasons.

Wodify has been a wonderful tool for us to use for the past 3 years, it has all the bells and whistles that we like and need. However, the cost of service and processing fees have causes us to look elsewhere. While on the search for a system that was functional for us without a lot of fluff and things we don’t need, we found ZenPlanner! ZenPlanner is simple to use and will help us in the areas that Wodify was lacking, like online scheduling for Personal Training and a schedule that integrates into our website! ZenPlanner’s service and processing fees are lower as well, which means, we can spend that money in areas that need improvement!

We are going to make this very easy and painless for you! Please follow the simple instructions below:

  • Nov 21st-27th is transition week. Familiarize yourself with ZenPlanner this week, but continue to schedule classes through Wodify.
    • If you have Stored Credit for merchandise, use it! This cannot be transferred over!
  • Nov 28th (Monday) we will only use ZenPlanner. Wodify will not be available.
    • Don’t Worry! We’re working on getting your strength data transferred as well!
  • All your information, such as profile and membership is already in ZenPlanner. The only thing that is not is your payment information.
    • You can either add a bank account/ACH online under your profile or we can do it for you. Drop off a voided check, or write down your routing and account number!
    • It costs us 3X MORE to process a debit/credit card transaction!!! (Not kidding. I can show you the math if you’re interested). With that being said, PLEASE USE A BANK ACCOUNT for your automatic monthly payments!
    • You will not have access to register for classes in ZenPlanner until your payment information is updated in ZenPlanner.
  • Other than specific strength data, which we are doing, you have this transition week to download your data from Wodify, if you are interested.
    • Wodify > My Performance > Select what info you want > All Time (or other date) > Export. That’s it. Then you’ll have it forever!

Please let us know if you have any questions! Change isn’t always good, but this time it is!

Instant Transformation

There is no such thing as instant transformation or overnight success. A long-term goal is something you want to accomplish in the future and it requires planning and consistency. When we set long-term goals it’s easy to overlook the time and effort it takes to get there. Most of us are familiar with S.M.A.R.T. goals, which are specific, measurable, attainable, realistic, and time-bound. Let’s take a look at S.M.A.R.T.E.R. goals, specifically the “E.R.”
The “E” stands for evaluate. The sixth step in goal setting is to make sure your goals are evaluated often. Long-term goals, that may take 6-12+ months to achieve, can easily be ignored if we don’t assess them frequently. Make sure you set up a system for evaluating your goals. One way to do this is to write your goals down, read them daily, and give yourself check points. At the end of each day, week, or month, take a look at the progress you’ve made towards your long-term goals.
The “R” stands for readjust. If you find that your progress is stalled, you’ve had a set-back, or your method for achieving your goal isn’t working, make sure you modify your approach. Don’t keep trying the same thing over and over again expecting a different result. If it’s not working for you, readjust. One way to do this is to ask for help. Reach out to your support system and coaches and ask for help changing your method. Your Coaches at Worthy are always ready and willing to meet with you to talk, and create a plan, for your goals. You do not need to do this on your own!
Set BIG goals, but focus on making progress and don’t worry too much about the amount of time it might take to get there. Remember to evaluate your goals often and readjust your approach if something isn’t working.
By: Conner Edelbrock

The Power of Insecurities

dsc_0089“When we own our imperfections, our insecurities lose their power over us.”
I developed body image issues at an early age, where I never felt comfortable in my own skin. I started swimming competitively at the age of five. My uniform was a swim suit, which is essentially like working out in your underwear everyday.
When I was in high school, I went through cycles of severe calorie restriction followed by episodes of binge eating. I developed an unhealthy obsession with food and would diet myself down to my ‘goal’ weight over and over again.
I was obsessed with the number on the scale and never happy with my reflection. This unhealthy relationship with food and self-image followed me into my 20’s. I was exhausted from fighting an internal battle and being plagued with self-doubt. I was always searching for solutions and ultimately wanted to feel a sense of peace.
We all want to feel comfortable in our own skin. Our self-concept is the belief we hold about about ourselves and is essential to self-love. I’m not going to pretend that I have it all together. Food and self-acceptance are still challenges, but I’ve slowly found peace with myself through CrossFit and the Worthy family.
Throwing away my scale and learning to fuel my body to be strong (not skinny) was a mental shift. It’s great to be surrounded by a community that believes in me when I don’t always believe in myself and to have coaches that take the time to educate on what ‘food as fuel’ really means.
By: Conner Edelbrock

Mastering the Art of Showing Up

dsc_0078Consistency is important for making progress. Many of us have heard the saying “90% of life is showing up.” This applies to your workouts too. If you’re in the habit of skipping your workouts each week, you’re limiting your progress and potential.
Being consistent is not about being perfect. Research shows that missing a single day will have no effect on long term success. However, missing workouts on a regular basis will. The number one reason people cite for not exercising regularly is ‘lack of time.’
One way to make your workouts a priority is to schedule them ahead of time. If you feel you’re struggling to find time for exercise, start to examine where you spend your time. How much time do you spend on Facebook or watching TV every day? If you don’t have time to make it to the gym, look for smaller pockets of time throughout your day to move. 10-20 minutes is more than enough time to exercise.
Scheduling your workouts each week will help you stay more consistent, but what happens when work, family, and life events upset your routine? Research by a Stanford professor, Kelly McGonigal, showed the number one reason people fail to remain consistent with their habits is they don’t have a plan for dealing with setbacks.
Having a plan to get back on track when setbacks occur or life gets busy is also important when maintaining consistency. If you have to be at work early and miss your morning workout, come to an evening class instead. If you’re injured and don’t think you can complete the workout that day, communicate with your coaches, who can modify and adjust the movements for you.
Lastly, learn to be stronger than your excuses. If you feel unmotivated or the workout looks scary, do yourself a favor and show up. Usually, the hardest part of the workout is starting. Once you get going, you will feel better about being there.

Where the Magic Happens

comfort“It’s the willingness to keep pushing through new challenges, not shrink from them back into your comfort zone, that separates the successful from the unsuccessful.”

-Jen Sincero, Author

 

Your comfort zone is where you experience no risk, no discomfort, no anxiety, and you’re content doing what you’re doing. When you live in your comfort zone, you are not growing.

If you want to reach your full potential, and continue to develop, you need step outside your comfort zone into your ‘growth zone.’ Do things that scare you by taking on new challenges and experiences. When you voluntarily put yourself in situations that challenge your boundaries, your fears lose power over you.

Stepping outside your comfort zone may make you feel uneasy. If you consistently push yourself out of your warm and cozy comfort zone, you get comfortable being uncomfortable, and it becomes easier to tackle obstacles and try new things. We all felt nervous about attending our first CrossFit class, but look at how much you’ve grown from taking that initial leap.

Commit to doing one thing every month that is outside your comfort zone. It could be entering your first CrossFit competition, speaking in front of a group, or attending a social event that you typically shy away from. Break out of your mold and find out what awaits you on the other side.

Comment below the “one thing” you’re going to do to get outside of your comfort zone!

By: Conner Edelbrock

Omega 3’s

Omega-3’s and Exercise

IMG_0008.jpgInflammation, free radical damage, tissue damage, catabolism of nutrient stores. What do these things have in common? They are what commonly occur when we are active in an intense fitness program (CrossFit). Let’s talk about a great source that can help prevent, reverse and repair these unwanted side effects of exercise.

Omega-3’s!

More specifically, fish oil. It’s one of the more popular supplements in the fitness industry. It’s been proven to reduce inflammation, joint pain, improves heart health, and can also improve the hair, skin, and nails. A number of studies have also shown that fish oil increases the deformability of red-blood cells. This is important in exercise because we need optimal blood flow during bouts of cardio or HIIT to reduce lactic acid build up and maintain oxygen to our working muscles.

There are many different kinds of fish oils from many sources. Krill and Cod is the top source for fish oil because the EPA and DHA are packaged as phospholipids, which can be used by your body immediately. Fish oil can also come in liquid form. It’s generally flavored to taste awesome, but some don’t. The benefit of liquid fish oil is that it is absorbed and digested easily and quickly by the body.

Though studies have mainly focused on the effectiveness of Omega-3’s on RBC deformability, muscle damage, and inflammation, there haven’t been many studies done on the links between Omega-3’s and exercise performance. But, if you add a fish oil supplement, you may see the benefits of reduced inflammation and muscle damage, which in turn may benefit your recovery so you can come in to the gym the next day ready to go again!

By Jared Bradford

BRIGHT SPOTS

Bright Spots

Bright spots are daily victories and successes that you experience inside and outside of the gym. We encourage everyone to focus on daily acts of excellence and celebrate their bright spots because positivity breeds more positivity.

It’s easy to be positive when everything in your life is going well. The hard part comes when you feel like you get knocked down. We all have bad days when we feel like crap during the workout, our job is stressful, and our family is driving us nuts. How we respond to these challenges is a choice.

Choose to stay optimistic during the tough times by changing your mindset. Start by focusing on what’s going well and always remember to include some fun in each day. When you’re having a frustrating day at the gym, remind yourself that training should be fun and the gym should be an escape. Finding just one thing, a bright spot, to be happy about or proud of will help change your mood.

“Bright Spots Friday” (BSF) is way to reflect on your week and revisit all the things that went well. In “The Champion’s Mind: How Great Athletes Think, Train, and Thrive,” author Jim Afremow writes “Too often…we think back to what went wrong or what we did not do rather than what went well or what we accomplished…reward yourself for a job well done by keeping success fresh in your mind.”

It’s important to review the high points, PR’s, and positive moments from the week. Overcoming daily challenges and savoring what you have accomplished will lead to future bright spots. Do not undervalue what you’ve accomplished this week. Give yourself a mental high-five and celebrate.

By Conner Edelbrock

Your Future Self

Respect Your Future Self
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Self-destructive habits can range from smoking, to sleep deprivation, to unhealthy eating. The task of quitting a bad habit, such as eating ‘junk’ food, is hard. In the present moment, we get instant gratification from eating foods, such as Oreos. This food is manufactured to be addictive and it’s difficult to stop at one, so we often devour the whole sleeve of cookies.
When we overindulge on junk food, we get an instant hit of sugar that releases a large amount of dopamine to the reward centers in our brain. Dopamine is a chemical in the body that plays a role in reward-motivated behavior. Most addictive drugs (sugar included) increase the levels of dopamine in the brain and make us crave and eat more.
The reason we struggle to change this type of behavior is because we are living in the present moment, and not weighing the pros and cons of each decision. Egonomics is a theory by Thomas Schelling that proposes we have two selves that are often at odds. You have a present self, who wants to devour a box of cookies, and your future self, who regrets your lack of restraint.
We think: Eating these Oreos are going to bring me enjoyment NOW.
We don’t think: This habit of eating Oreos could lead to obesity, health problems, self-esteem issues, and high medical bills LATER.
The answer to this dilemma is to replace the bad habit with a good habit that you enjoy immensely. Instead of eating a sleeve of cookies, sit down to your crocheting or take your dog for a walk. Focus on the enjoyment of the new habit and consistently replace the old action with the new one.
If you still want cookies, have a cookie! Diets that are too restrictive will backfire. Go out and buy yourself one cookie to enjoy, rather than diving into an entire box of cookies when Girl Scout season rolls around.
By Conner Edelbrock

Inner Perfectionist

Slay The Inner Perfectionist
Perfectionism can be a fatal flaw, especially when it comes to CrossFit. You might compare yourself to others; be constantly dissatisfied with your performance; obsess over your position on the whiteboard; overthink a technical lift; or be afraid to fail or appear weak.
To overcome your inner perfectionist, start by focusing on doing you best. Sometimes we have a bad day, when we don’t perform well. Realize that it’s impossible to maintain a peak level of performance every single day. You may not PR or get a gold star every workout. Each day brings an opportunity for us to do our best, but realize there is a process that includes highs and lows.
Focus on long term goals. When we make goals to lift heavier, lose weight, or learn a new skill, we ignore the steps it takes to accomplish those goals. We often expect instant transformation and forget that there is no such thing as an overnight success.
Sometimes we just need to relax and have fun. As a perfectionist, you may get caught up in mastering every detail of a snatch or clean. Realize that there are times to focus on technique and then there are times to relax and just lift.
Lastly, take a step back and look at how far you’ve come. Progress might seem slow, but look at where you started and celebrate what you’ve accomplished.
By Conner Edelbrock

Support, Friend, Community

Strength In Numbers
Research has shown that the most important factor in achieving long term health and wellness is having a support system. Fitness buddies provide motivation, accountability, and healthy competition.
There are days when we all show up to a workout exhausted and are instantly reenergized by our workout companions. A twelve month exercise adherence study at Indiana University found that people who exercised with a partner had only a 6.3% dropout rate, compared to the 43% dropout rate found in those who exercised alone.
Workout buddies are also great for holding you accountable. Many people wouldn’t wake up at 5:00AM if it weren’t for the other athletes joining them at the gym. Working out in groups provides what Jean Fain, of Harvard Medical School, calls common humanity, “the understanding that suffering is part of the human experience, that you are not alone and others suffer similarly.”
Lastly, working out with others will often elevate your own performance. The Kohler Effect is not wanting to be the weakest link in a group or partnership, which is why we often see people push themselves more in a group class vs. individually.
By Conner Edelbrock