The Power of Insecurities

dsc_0089“When we own our imperfections, our insecurities lose their power over us.”
I developed body image issues at an early age, where I never felt comfortable in my own skin. I started swimming competitively at the age of five. My uniform was a swim suit, which is essentially like working out in your underwear everyday.
When I was in high school, I went through cycles of severe calorie restriction followed by episodes of binge eating. I developed an unhealthy obsession with food and would diet myself down to my ‘goal’ weight over and over again.
I was obsessed with the number on the scale and never happy with my reflection. This unhealthy relationship with food and self-image followed me into my 20’s. I was exhausted from fighting an internal battle and being plagued with self-doubt. I was always searching for solutions and ultimately wanted to feel a sense of peace.
We all want to feel comfortable in our own skin. Our self-concept is the belief we hold about about ourselves and is essential to self-love. I’m not going to pretend that I have it all together. Food and self-acceptance are still challenges, but I’ve slowly found peace with myself through CrossFit and the Worthy family.
Throwing away my scale and learning to fuel my body to be strong (not skinny) was a mental shift. It’s great to be surrounded by a community that believes in me when I don’t always believe in myself and to have coaches that take the time to educate on what ‘food as fuel’ really means.
By: Conner Edelbrock

The Easiest Choice

dsc_0106When we get busy we tend to sacrifice our nutrition by skipping meals, hitting the vending machine, or finding a drive-thru. When we get hungry and don’t have healthy choices at our fingertips, we become victim to whatever is convenient. Make the healthier choice the easier choice. Set yourself up for success each week by getting in the habit of meal prepping.

Meal prepping is spending one day planning your meals for the week ahead. Having ready-to-go meals in your fridge makes your food choices during the week simple. If your nutrition is overly complicated, it won’t be sustainable. Meal prepping will be your best friend because it makes healthier food choices a no-brainer.

Strategies for meal prepping are to pick one afternoon that works in your schedule to do some bulk cooking (typically Sundays work well for most people). Purchase lean protein sources, vegetables, and starches. Cook your meat, chop your vegetables, hard boil your eggs, ready your rice, and bake your potatoes.

Make sure you have a lot of Tupperware containers on hand. Some people like to portion out their meals in each container. The key is to make sure everything is precooked and easy for you to grab in hurry. Crockpots are a great kitchen tool that will allow you to make a lot of food that you can eat throughout the week. Also, invest in a lunchbox. Find a bag that is insulated that you can pack your food in each day.

Don’t forget about snacks! Have healthy snacks, such as nuts, Rx Bars, whey protein packets, baby food pouches, and beef jerky, stashed everywhere. Put them in your car, bag, and desk. If hunger strikes you’ll be ready for it.

BY: Conner Edelbrock

Your Future Self

Respect Your Future Self
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Self-destructive habits can range from smoking, to sleep deprivation, to unhealthy eating. The task of quitting a bad habit, such as eating ‘junk’ food, is hard. In the present moment, we get instant gratification from eating foods, such as Oreos. This food is manufactured to be addictive and it’s difficult to stop at one, so we often devour the whole sleeve of cookies.
When we overindulge on junk food, we get an instant hit of sugar that releases a large amount of dopamine to the reward centers in our brain. Dopamine is a chemical in the body that plays a role in reward-motivated behavior. Most addictive drugs (sugar included) increase the levels of dopamine in the brain and make us crave and eat more.
The reason we struggle to change this type of behavior is because we are living in the present moment, and not weighing the pros and cons of each decision. Egonomics is a theory by Thomas Schelling that proposes we have two selves that are often at odds. You have a present self, who wants to devour a box of cookies, and your future self, who regrets your lack of restraint.
We think: Eating these Oreos are going to bring me enjoyment NOW.
We don’t think: This habit of eating Oreos could lead to obesity, health problems, self-esteem issues, and high medical bills LATER.
The answer to this dilemma is to replace the bad habit with a good habit that you enjoy immensely. Instead of eating a sleeve of cookies, sit down to your crocheting or take your dog for a walk. Focus on the enjoyment of the new habit and consistently replace the old action with the new one.
If you still want cookies, have a cookie! Diets that are too restrictive will backfire. Go out and buy yourself one cookie to enjoy, rather than diving into an entire box of cookies when Girl Scout season rolls around.
By Conner Edelbrock

Chocolate Milk

Why Runners are Obsessed with Chocolate Milk  (How Runners make the Post-Workout Simpler)

Heart pounding, legs burning, a runner reaches the final stretch of his race. With an all out burst of speed he crosses the finish line. His legs are rubbery as he stumbles to the scoring table and then off to a cooler in the team tent. Thrusting a hand into the cooler, he grabs up his post-run beverage—chocolate milk.

Runners have a long-standing history with chocolate milk that is actually supported by nutritional science. A pint of chocolate milk contains about twelve grams of protein, thirty grams of carbohydrates, and a few grams of fat. This is an adequate balance of macronutrients after a workout.

Building muscle and recovering requires the body to synthesize proteins. Proteins are large molecules in our systems that perform vital functions. Some of the building blocks for proteins, amino acids, are naturally created in our bodies. The rest are salvaged from the protein we eat.

Carbohydrates serve a dual function. The first function is replenishing energy stores. Carbs are broken down into sugars during digestion and stored as glycogen, a starchy molecule readily available to once again become sugar when our body needs energy. The second function is helping proteins enter our cells to be used.  The presence of sugar in the bloodstream triggers insulin release. Insulin signals cells to take in sugar, take in amino acids, and synthesize more protein.

Fats are equally important for recovery, but they are required in much smaller quantities. Fats are composed of lipids. Lipids serve as transportation molecules and give structural strength to cells.  Fats can also be used as a slow, sustainable energy source. A few grams of fat are plenty for a post-workout snack.

Getting nutrients after a workout doesn’t have to be complicated or expensive. Take a page from the runner’s playbook and grab a chocolate milk.

By Brock Crystal

FRANK SINATRA & POWERLIFTING

dsc_0061Music has become essential to our enjoyment at the gym. Research has shown that music will influence performance in several ways. First, people will naturally follow tempo, which is the principle of entrainment or synchronization. We tend to run, bike, or row to the dominate beat of the music. A faster beat will often lead to increased intensity.
Music also increases motivation and elevates our mood, making our experience at the gym more fun. We use certain songs to get ‘pumped’ or ‘psyched’ before a big lift or competition. However, it’s possible to be overstimulated. If our stress levels skyrocket it could negatively affect our performance. If you become extremely nervous, choose music that is relaxing and calming to bring your heart rate down.
Lastly, music distracts people from discomfort they might experience during a workout. Several marathons have banned the use of music during races to prevent runners from having a competitive advantage. One study, at Brunel University, showed that music helps us tolerate more pain and increases endurance by as much as 15 percent.
Whether it’s Frank Sinatra, Power Metal, or The Black Eyed Peas, find your jam and crush your next workout.
By Conner Edelbrock

Electrolyte Imbalance

Electrolyte Imbalance

dsc_0407What do you think of when you hear the word “electrolyte”? Most likely what comes to mind is sugary, expensive and popular sports drinks. They claim to provide us with necessary electrolytes to power us through workouts and keep us hydrated. But what is an electrolyte? Why do you need them? What happens when we have an electrolyte imbalance? Let’s dive in!

An electrolyte is a chemical in the body that regulates bodily functions. They include sodium, calcium, chloride, potassium, and magnesium. Your nerves and muscles depend greatly on these chemicals doing their job and staying in a normal concentration range on the inside and outside of your cells!

Essentially, these electrolytes are responsible for maintaining fluid balance in your body, they play a vital role in muscle contraction (including your heart!), and some also play a role in building protein. This is why you need them. Without calcium and sodium, your muscles will not contract, and you definitely won’t be having a very good workout that day if that’s the case.

So what causes an electrolyte imbalance? Generally a loss of fluid will be the culprit. Loss of fluid can be from sweating or from being sick. This can lead to muscle spasms, weakness, lethargy, and some other serious side effects. Not good!

The good news is, if an electrolyte imbalance occurs due to working out, it’s relatively easy to restore your body back to normal. Yes, those sports drinks will help, but they aren’t the BEST source to replace electrolytes. Food such as bananas, sweet potatoes, tomatoes, watermelon, and pineapple are all great sources to maintain electrolytes.

We take in a lot of these electrolytes every day through the food we eat. Imbalances happen but if you maintain a healthy diet and constant fluid intake throughout the day, with small sips of water or sports drink during your workout, your electrolytes will be balanced and happy!

By Jared Bradford

Run the day or it’ll run you!

THE SECRET TO DAILY PRODUCTIVITY 
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“Either run the day or the day runs you.” Productivity is making progress in areas of your life that are important. One productivity strategy that is simple and works is:
Do the most important thing first.
Sometimes our to-do list is never ending. Dealing with this challenge starts by defining the top three most important tasks (M.I.T.). This concept isn’t new, but it allows you to evaluate and prioritize your overwhelming list into three manageable items you can conquer at the beginning of each day.
Usually the most important items aren’t the easiest to accomplish. We often spend hours crossing off the simpler items on our list, and never get to the more important ones. By tackling our M.I.T. at the beginning of the day, our energy and effort are at a peak.
If you don’t take time to write down and focus on your M.I.T. your day will escape you. Phone’s will start ringing, emails will start piling up, and your energy will be drained. Start each day with a plan of attack by defining your top three priorities.
P.S. Your workout should be one of these priorities. If you’re not a “morning person” carve out some time every day, where can devote your undivided attention to accomplishing your M.I.T.
By Conner Edelbrock

03.18.2013

Today marks the start of our Paleo Challenge 🙂 The challenge will run until April 20th! Wish all our athletes luck with 32 days of NO GRAINS, NO DAIRY, & NO SUGAR (includes soy and processed crap!!)!  But think aout all the delicious meals you CAN eat: combining Meat & Vegies has an infinite amount of possibilities!  Throughout the challenge and after the 32 days we will have some amazing stories, so stay tuned!

Now, lets take a look at some awesomeness:

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PALEO 2.0 WOD:
 
STRENGTH- Back Squat 3RM
WOD-        For Time:
21-15-9
Overhead Squat 115/75#
Push Ups
Wall Ball 20/14#