Where the Magic Happens

comfort“It’s the willingness to keep pushing through new challenges, not shrink from them back into your comfort zone, that separates the successful from the unsuccessful.”

-Jen Sincero, Author

 

Your comfort zone is where you experience no risk, no discomfort, no anxiety, and you’re content doing what you’re doing. When you live in your comfort zone, you are not growing.

If you want to reach your full potential, and continue to develop, you need step outside your comfort zone into your ‘growth zone.’ Do things that scare you by taking on new challenges and experiences. When you voluntarily put yourself in situations that challenge your boundaries, your fears lose power over you.

Stepping outside your comfort zone may make you feel uneasy. If you consistently push yourself out of your warm and cozy comfort zone, you get comfortable being uncomfortable, and it becomes easier to tackle obstacles and try new things. We all felt nervous about attending our first CrossFit class, but look at how much you’ve grown from taking that initial leap.

Commit to doing one thing every month that is outside your comfort zone. It could be entering your first CrossFit competition, speaking in front of a group, or attending a social event that you typically shy away from. Break out of your mold and find out what awaits you on the other side.

Comment below the “one thing” you’re going to do to get outside of your comfort zone!

By: Conner Edelbrock

The Easiest Choice

dsc_0106When we get busy we tend to sacrifice our nutrition by skipping meals, hitting the vending machine, or finding a drive-thru. When we get hungry and don’t have healthy choices at our fingertips, we become victim to whatever is convenient. Make the healthier choice the easier choice. Set yourself up for success each week by getting in the habit of meal prepping.

Meal prepping is spending one day planning your meals for the week ahead. Having ready-to-go meals in your fridge makes your food choices during the week simple. If your nutrition is overly complicated, it won’t be sustainable. Meal prepping will be your best friend because it makes healthier food choices a no-brainer.

Strategies for meal prepping are to pick one afternoon that works in your schedule to do some bulk cooking (typically Sundays work well for most people). Purchase lean protein sources, vegetables, and starches. Cook your meat, chop your vegetables, hard boil your eggs, ready your rice, and bake your potatoes.

Make sure you have a lot of Tupperware containers on hand. Some people like to portion out their meals in each container. The key is to make sure everything is precooked and easy for you to grab in hurry. Crockpots are a great kitchen tool that will allow you to make a lot of food that you can eat throughout the week. Also, invest in a lunchbox. Find a bag that is insulated that you can pack your food in each day.

Don’t forget about snacks! Have healthy snacks, such as nuts, Rx Bars, whey protein packets, baby food pouches, and beef jerky, stashed everywhere. Put them in your car, bag, and desk. If hunger strikes you’ll be ready for it.

BY: Conner Edelbrock

Inner Perfectionist

Slay The Inner Perfectionist
Perfectionism can be a fatal flaw, especially when it comes to CrossFit. You might compare yourself to others; be constantly dissatisfied with your performance; obsess over your position on the whiteboard; overthink a technical lift; or be afraid to fail or appear weak.
To overcome your inner perfectionist, start by focusing on doing you best. Sometimes we have a bad day, when we don’t perform well. Realize that it’s impossible to maintain a peak level of performance every single day. You may not PR or get a gold star every workout. Each day brings an opportunity for us to do our best, but realize there is a process that includes highs and lows.
Focus on long term goals. When we make goals to lift heavier, lose weight, or learn a new skill, we ignore the steps it takes to accomplish those goals. We often expect instant transformation and forget that there is no such thing as an overnight success.
Sometimes we just need to relax and have fun. As a perfectionist, you may get caught up in mastering every detail of a snatch or clean. Realize that there are times to focus on technique and then there are times to relax and just lift.
Lastly, take a step back and look at how far you’ve come. Progress might seem slow, but look at where you started and celebrate what you’ve accomplished.
By Conner Edelbrock

Chocolate Milk

Why Runners are Obsessed with Chocolate Milk  (How Runners make the Post-Workout Simpler)

Heart pounding, legs burning, a runner reaches the final stretch of his race. With an all out burst of speed he crosses the finish line. His legs are rubbery as he stumbles to the scoring table and then off to a cooler in the team tent. Thrusting a hand into the cooler, he grabs up his post-run beverage—chocolate milk.

Runners have a long-standing history with chocolate milk that is actually supported by nutritional science. A pint of chocolate milk contains about twelve grams of protein, thirty grams of carbohydrates, and a few grams of fat. This is an adequate balance of macronutrients after a workout.

Building muscle and recovering requires the body to synthesize proteins. Proteins are large molecules in our systems that perform vital functions. Some of the building blocks for proteins, amino acids, are naturally created in our bodies. The rest are salvaged from the protein we eat.

Carbohydrates serve a dual function. The first function is replenishing energy stores. Carbs are broken down into sugars during digestion and stored as glycogen, a starchy molecule readily available to once again become sugar when our body needs energy. The second function is helping proteins enter our cells to be used.  The presence of sugar in the bloodstream triggers insulin release. Insulin signals cells to take in sugar, take in amino acids, and synthesize more protein.

Fats are equally important for recovery, but they are required in much smaller quantities. Fats are composed of lipids. Lipids serve as transportation molecules and give structural strength to cells.  Fats can also be used as a slow, sustainable energy source. A few grams of fat are plenty for a post-workout snack.

Getting nutrients after a workout doesn’t have to be complicated or expensive. Take a page from the runner’s playbook and grab a chocolate milk.

By Brock Crystal

Run the day or it’ll run you!

THE SECRET TO DAILY PRODUCTIVITY 
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“Either run the day or the day runs you.” Productivity is making progress in areas of your life that are important. One productivity strategy that is simple and works is:
Do the most important thing first.
Sometimes our to-do list is never ending. Dealing with this challenge starts by defining the top three most important tasks (M.I.T.). This concept isn’t new, but it allows you to evaluate and prioritize your overwhelming list into three manageable items you can conquer at the beginning of each day.
Usually the most important items aren’t the easiest to accomplish. We often spend hours crossing off the simpler items on our list, and never get to the more important ones. By tackling our M.I.T. at the beginning of the day, our energy and effort are at a peak.
If you don’t take time to write down and focus on your M.I.T. your day will escape you. Phone’s will start ringing, emails will start piling up, and your energy will be drained. Start each day with a plan of attack by defining your top three priorities.
P.S. Your workout should be one of these priorities. If you’re not a “morning person” carve out some time every day, where can devote your undivided attention to accomplishing your M.I.T.
By Conner Edelbrock

Better Performance in 5-Minutes!

DSC_0117The basic principle behind doing a dynamic range of motion warm-up is to prep your body for movement by elevating your heart rate and improving circulation, thereby increasing blood flow and “warming up” your working muscles. Warming up properly will lead to a better performance once the real work begins. Above all, injury prevention is our number one reason to warm-up. On day one at CrossFit Worthy, everyone is taught 10 movements that we refer to as DROM (Dynamic Range of Motion). Let’s go over them again so we can fully understand the purpose and effect of each movement so you can better determine which exercises you NEED to be doing before EVERY workout and why.

  • High Knees:
    • Stretch glutes, hamstrings, hip flexors
  • Butt Kickers:
    • Stretch quads, hip flexors
  • Karaoke:
    • Improve coordination
    • Warms-up abductors, adductors, calves, gain Range of Motion (ROM) in torso/spine
  • Straight Legs:
    • Stretch Hamstrings, glutes, calves, spinal erectors
    • Improve balance
  • Open the Gate:
    • Stretch adductors, gain ROM in external rotation of hips
  • Close the Gate:
    • Stretch abductors, glutes, gain ROM in internal rotation of hips.
  • Squat and Shuffle:
    • Stretch adductors, quads, hamstrings.
    • Glute activation
  • Bear Crawl:
    • Warms-up shoulders, builds shoulder strength and stability
    • Increases hip mobility
    • Improves shoulder and scapula function
  • Crab Walk:
    • Stretches chest muscles, shoulder and hip flexors
  • Inch Worm:
    • Stretches hamstrings, glutes, calves, low back muscles and lats
    • Improves scapula function, hip function
  • Spiderman:
    • Stretches hip flexor, glutes, calves, hamstrings, adductors

What you need to be doing before every workout:

  1. Move to an aerobic warm-up (Row, Bike, or Run 3-5 minutes)
  2. DROM
  3. Crossover Activation
  4. Foam Roll if needed

Here’s a guideline to follow if you are sore/tight in certain key areas:

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Foam Rolling has a purpose in warming up, but it is NOT the only thing you should be doing. Foam rolling breaks up fascia to help get muscle flexible again, but without an elevated heart rate, blood won’t circulate to warm your muscles.

Arriving just 10-minutes before the start of class, getting these things done,  can give you the most benefit and enjoyment out of the workout that day. We are creatures of habit, so make good warm up habits. If you don’t have good warm up habits, make new ones, now. It doesn’t take long and your lifts will thank you!