The Power of Insecurities

dsc_0089“When we own our imperfections, our insecurities lose their power over us.”
I developed body image issues at an early age, where I never felt comfortable in my own skin. I started swimming competitively at the age of five. My uniform was a swim suit, which is essentially like working out in your underwear everyday.
When I was in high school, I went through cycles of severe calorie restriction followed by episodes of binge eating. I developed an unhealthy obsession with food and would diet myself down to my ‘goal’ weight over and over again.
I was obsessed with the number on the scale and never happy with my reflection. This unhealthy relationship with food and self-image followed me into my 20’s. I was exhausted from fighting an internal battle and being plagued with self-doubt. I was always searching for solutions and ultimately wanted to feel a sense of peace.
We all want to feel comfortable in our own skin. Our self-concept is the belief we hold about about ourselves and is essential to self-love. I’m not going to pretend that I have it all together. Food and self-acceptance are still challenges, but I’ve slowly found peace with myself through CrossFit and the Worthy family.
Throwing away my scale and learning to fuel my body to be strong (not skinny) was a mental shift. It’s great to be surrounded by a community that believes in me when I don’t always believe in myself and to have coaches that take the time to educate on what ‘food as fuel’ really means.
By: Conner Edelbrock

Environment = Goals

Change Your Environment to Match Your Goals 
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Your environment encompasses all of the spaces you spend your time, such as your home, car, and office. The best way to start changing your habits are to take control of your environment. When you examine all of these spaces ask yourself: Is my environment helping or hindering my goals?

Strategies for changing your environment are to identify the places that are encouraging unhealthy behaviors, cleaning up those spaces, and implementing a support system.

First, identify the places and cues that are encouraging unhealthy behaviors. Start with your home, especially the kitchen, as well as your car and office because these are the places you have the most control over.

Take a look at what’s on your kitchen counters, in your fridge and pantry. Do you have jars of candy sitting out at home or in the office? Are there candy bars stashed in the glove compartment of your car? Is your freezer stocked with pints of Ben & Jerry’s?

Second, clean up those spaces and remove unhealthy temptations and triggers. Your first instinct might be to throw away all of the junk food, but remember this is a lifestyle change. Think about what’s going to be realistic for you and your family.

If you’re like me and know that bags of chips and pints of ice cream don’t stand a chance of making it through night, remove them from your environment. Don’t buy the foods that make you lose all self-control or consider buying individual portions of your favorite foods or take the time to pre-portion those foods yourself.

The goal is to make the healthiest choice the easiest choice. Stock your kitchen with healthy, whole foods that are easy to access. Preparing your food ahead of time and portioning it out makes it easy to grab-and-go. Having a fruit bowl on the counter vs. a candy jar makes it easier to grab an apple rather than a handful of M&M’s.

Lastly, find and implement a support system. Research has demonstrated that a support system is positively related to maintaining a healthy lifestyle. Your relationships with family, friends, coworkers, and coaches will have an impact on creating healthy habits. Surround yourself with people, who are going to support your goals and help you create an environment that will lead to lasting results.

Remember to ask for help. Some people may think it’s a sign of weakness, but we are all here to support your goals and help you create a healthier environment. Setbacks will happen. Living a healthy lifestyle is not a sprint, it’s marathon. Focus on making small changes in your immediate environment that will lead to better habits over time.

By Conner Edelbrock