Where the Magic Happens

comfort“It’s the willingness to keep pushing through new challenges, not shrink from them back into your comfort zone, that separates the successful from the unsuccessful.”

-Jen Sincero, Author

 

Your comfort zone is where you experience no risk, no discomfort, no anxiety, and you’re content doing what you’re doing. When you live in your comfort zone, you are not growing.

If you want to reach your full potential, and continue to develop, you need step outside your comfort zone into your ‘growth zone.’ Do things that scare you by taking on new challenges and experiences. When you voluntarily put yourself in situations that challenge your boundaries, your fears lose power over you.

Stepping outside your comfort zone may make you feel uneasy. If you consistently push yourself out of your warm and cozy comfort zone, you get comfortable being uncomfortable, and it becomes easier to tackle obstacles and try new things. We all felt nervous about attending our first CrossFit class, but look at how much you’ve grown from taking that initial leap.

Commit to doing one thing every month that is outside your comfort zone. It could be entering your first CrossFit competition, speaking in front of a group, or attending a social event that you typically shy away from. Break out of your mold and find out what awaits you on the other side.

Comment below the “one thing” you’re going to do to get outside of your comfort zone!

By: Conner Edelbrock

FRANK SINATRA & POWERLIFTING

dsc_0061Music has become essential to our enjoyment at the gym. Research has shown that music will influence performance in several ways. First, people will naturally follow tempo, which is the principle of entrainment or synchronization. We tend to run, bike, or row to the dominate beat of the music. A faster beat will often lead to increased intensity.
Music also increases motivation and elevates our mood, making our experience at the gym more fun. We use certain songs to get ‘pumped’ or ‘psyched’ before a big lift or competition. However, it’s possible to be overstimulated. If our stress levels skyrocket it could negatively affect our performance. If you become extremely nervous, choose music that is relaxing and calming to bring your heart rate down.
Lastly, music distracts people from discomfort they might experience during a workout. Several marathons have banned the use of music during races to prevent runners from having a competitive advantage. One study, at Brunel University, showed that music helps us tolerate more pain and increases endurance by as much as 15 percent.
Whether it’s Frank Sinatra, Power Metal, or The Black Eyed Peas, find your jam and crush your next workout.
By Conner Edelbrock

Run the day or it’ll run you!

THE SECRET TO DAILY PRODUCTIVITY 
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“Either run the day or the day runs you.” Productivity is making progress in areas of your life that are important. One productivity strategy that is simple and works is:
Do the most important thing first.
Sometimes our to-do list is never ending. Dealing with this challenge starts by defining the top three most important tasks (M.I.T.). This concept isn’t new, but it allows you to evaluate and prioritize your overwhelming list into three manageable items you can conquer at the beginning of each day.
Usually the most important items aren’t the easiest to accomplish. We often spend hours crossing off the simpler items on our list, and never get to the more important ones. By tackling our M.I.T. at the beginning of the day, our energy and effort are at a peak.
If you don’t take time to write down and focus on your M.I.T. your day will escape you. Phone’s will start ringing, emails will start piling up, and your energy will be drained. Start each day with a plan of attack by defining your top three priorities.
P.S. Your workout should be one of these priorities. If you’re not a “morning person” carve out some time every day, where can devote your undivided attention to accomplishing your M.I.T.
By Conner Edelbrock

Depression + Exercise = :)

dsc_0159It’s no secret: exercise can make you feel better. It can boost your mood, confidence, self-esteem, and can help you achieve personal goals and challenges in your life. That being said, what if exercise could alleviate, halt, and reverse, depression and anxiety?
Exercise works to ease depression and anxiety by releasing and enhancing the effect of endorphins. Endorphins improve immunity, reduce perception of pain, and improve mood. Over 19 million people deal with depression ranging from mild to severe. Can we use exercise to turn this around?

A study was done in 1999 and was published in Archives of Internal Medicine. It divided 156 men and women with depression in to three groups. One group took part in regular, structured exercise, a second group took an SSRI (Anti-Depressant), and a third group did both. After 16 weeks, depression had eased in all three groups. Their scores on a depression rating scales were essentially identical. What could this mean?

The study suggests that if you wish to avoid drugs, exercise may be a suitable alternative. The study also proved that SSRI’s such as Zoloft worked quicker to alleviate depression in comparison to the group that only exercised. However, a follow-up study showed the effects of exercise on depression lasted longer. That is, those who stopped taking their SSRI were far more likely to relapse in comparison to those who stopped exercising.

Exercise can be anything from lifting weights, running, playing sports, to walking; as long it is structured and repeated routine. This could be why CrossFit is such a powerful tool. Not only do we use all forms of exercise, we do it in a supportive, loving community in which every person can do the same work out and feel that same satisfaction at the end of the work out.

By Jared Bradford

Environment = Goals

Change Your Environment to Match Your Goals 
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Your environment encompasses all of the spaces you spend your time, such as your home, car, and office. The best way to start changing your habits are to take control of your environment. When you examine all of these spaces ask yourself: Is my environment helping or hindering my goals?

Strategies for changing your environment are to identify the places that are encouraging unhealthy behaviors, cleaning up those spaces, and implementing a support system.

First, identify the places and cues that are encouraging unhealthy behaviors. Start with your home, especially the kitchen, as well as your car and office because these are the places you have the most control over.

Take a look at what’s on your kitchen counters, in your fridge and pantry. Do you have jars of candy sitting out at home or in the office? Are there candy bars stashed in the glove compartment of your car? Is your freezer stocked with pints of Ben & Jerry’s?

Second, clean up those spaces and remove unhealthy temptations and triggers. Your first instinct might be to throw away all of the junk food, but remember this is a lifestyle change. Think about what’s going to be realistic for you and your family.

If you’re like me and know that bags of chips and pints of ice cream don’t stand a chance of making it through night, remove them from your environment. Don’t buy the foods that make you lose all self-control or consider buying individual portions of your favorite foods or take the time to pre-portion those foods yourself.

The goal is to make the healthiest choice the easiest choice. Stock your kitchen with healthy, whole foods that are easy to access. Preparing your food ahead of time and portioning it out makes it easy to grab-and-go. Having a fruit bowl on the counter vs. a candy jar makes it easier to grab an apple rather than a handful of M&M’s.

Lastly, find and implement a support system. Research has demonstrated that a support system is positively related to maintaining a healthy lifestyle. Your relationships with family, friends, coworkers, and coaches will have an impact on creating healthy habits. Surround yourself with people, who are going to support your goals and help you create an environment that will lead to lasting results.

Remember to ask for help. Some people may think it’s a sign of weakness, but we are all here to support your goals and help you create a healthier environment. Setbacks will happen. Living a healthy lifestyle is not a sprint, it’s marathon. Focus on making small changes in your immediate environment that will lead to better habits over time.

By Conner Edelbrock