Where the Magic Happens

comfort“It’s the willingness to keep pushing through new challenges, not shrink from them back into your comfort zone, that separates the successful from the unsuccessful.”

-Jen Sincero, Author

 

Your comfort zone is where you experience no risk, no discomfort, no anxiety, and you’re content doing what you’re doing. When you live in your comfort zone, you are not growing.

If you want to reach your full potential, and continue to develop, you need step outside your comfort zone into your ‘growth zone.’ Do things that scare you by taking on new challenges and experiences. When you voluntarily put yourself in situations that challenge your boundaries, your fears lose power over you.

Stepping outside your comfort zone may make you feel uneasy. If you consistently push yourself out of your warm and cozy comfort zone, you get comfortable being uncomfortable, and it becomes easier to tackle obstacles and try new things. We all felt nervous about attending our first CrossFit class, but look at how much you’ve grown from taking that initial leap.

Commit to doing one thing every month that is outside your comfort zone. It could be entering your first CrossFit competition, speaking in front of a group, or attending a social event that you typically shy away from. Break out of your mold and find out what awaits you on the other side.

Comment below the “one thing” you’re going to do to get outside of your comfort zone!

By: Conner Edelbrock

Inner Perfectionist

Slay The Inner Perfectionist
Perfectionism can be a fatal flaw, especially when it comes to CrossFit. You might compare yourself to others; be constantly dissatisfied with your performance; obsess over your position on the whiteboard; overthink a technical lift; or be afraid to fail or appear weak.
To overcome your inner perfectionist, start by focusing on doing you best. Sometimes we have a bad day, when we don’t perform well. Realize that it’s impossible to maintain a peak level of performance every single day. You may not PR or get a gold star every workout. Each day brings an opportunity for us to do our best, but realize there is a process that includes highs and lows.
Focus on long term goals. When we make goals to lift heavier, lose weight, or learn a new skill, we ignore the steps it takes to accomplish those goals. We often expect instant transformation and forget that there is no such thing as an overnight success.
Sometimes we just need to relax and have fun. As a perfectionist, you may get caught up in mastering every detail of a snatch or clean. Realize that there are times to focus on technique and then there are times to relax and just lift.
Lastly, take a step back and look at how far you’ve come. Progress might seem slow, but look at where you started and celebrate what you’ve accomplished.
By Conner Edelbrock

Chocolate Milk

Why Runners are Obsessed with Chocolate Milk  (How Runners make the Post-Workout Simpler)

Heart pounding, legs burning, a runner reaches the final stretch of his race. With an all out burst of speed he crosses the finish line. His legs are rubbery as he stumbles to the scoring table and then off to a cooler in the team tent. Thrusting a hand into the cooler, he grabs up his post-run beverage—chocolate milk.

Runners have a long-standing history with chocolate milk that is actually supported by nutritional science. A pint of chocolate milk contains about twelve grams of protein, thirty grams of carbohydrates, and a few grams of fat. This is an adequate balance of macronutrients after a workout.

Building muscle and recovering requires the body to synthesize proteins. Proteins are large molecules in our systems that perform vital functions. Some of the building blocks for proteins, amino acids, are naturally created in our bodies. The rest are salvaged from the protein we eat.

Carbohydrates serve a dual function. The first function is replenishing energy stores. Carbs are broken down into sugars during digestion and stored as glycogen, a starchy molecule readily available to once again become sugar when our body needs energy. The second function is helping proteins enter our cells to be used.  The presence of sugar in the bloodstream triggers insulin release. Insulin signals cells to take in sugar, take in amino acids, and synthesize more protein.

Fats are equally important for recovery, but they are required in much smaller quantities. Fats are composed of lipids. Lipids serve as transportation molecules and give structural strength to cells.  Fats can also be used as a slow, sustainable energy source. A few grams of fat are plenty for a post-workout snack.

Getting nutrients after a workout doesn’t have to be complicated or expensive. Take a page from the runner’s playbook and grab a chocolate milk.

By Brock Crystal

FRANK SINATRA & POWERLIFTING

dsc_0061Music has become essential to our enjoyment at the gym. Research has shown that music will influence performance in several ways. First, people will naturally follow tempo, which is the principle of entrainment or synchronization. We tend to run, bike, or row to the dominate beat of the music. A faster beat will often lead to increased intensity.
Music also increases motivation and elevates our mood, making our experience at the gym more fun. We use certain songs to get ‘pumped’ or ‘psyched’ before a big lift or competition. However, it’s possible to be overstimulated. If our stress levels skyrocket it could negatively affect our performance. If you become extremely nervous, choose music that is relaxing and calming to bring your heart rate down.
Lastly, music distracts people from discomfort they might experience during a workout. Several marathons have banned the use of music during races to prevent runners from having a competitive advantage. One study, at Brunel University, showed that music helps us tolerate more pain and increases endurance by as much as 15 percent.
Whether it’s Frank Sinatra, Power Metal, or The Black Eyed Peas, find your jam and crush your next workout.
By Conner Edelbrock

Run the day or it’ll run you!

THE SECRET TO DAILY PRODUCTIVITY 
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“Either run the day or the day runs you.” Productivity is making progress in areas of your life that are important. One productivity strategy that is simple and works is:
Do the most important thing first.
Sometimes our to-do list is never ending. Dealing with this challenge starts by defining the top three most important tasks (M.I.T.). This concept isn’t new, but it allows you to evaluate and prioritize your overwhelming list into three manageable items you can conquer at the beginning of each day.
Usually the most important items aren’t the easiest to accomplish. We often spend hours crossing off the simpler items on our list, and never get to the more important ones. By tackling our M.I.T. at the beginning of the day, our energy and effort are at a peak.
If you don’t take time to write down and focus on your M.I.T. your day will escape you. Phone’s will start ringing, emails will start piling up, and your energy will be drained. Start each day with a plan of attack by defining your top three priorities.
P.S. Your workout should be one of these priorities. If you’re not a “morning person” carve out some time every day, where can devote your undivided attention to accomplishing your M.I.T.
By Conner Edelbrock

What all Worthy-ers need to know

Let’s review the ground rules. Your coaches will do their best to remind you of these simple things as well.DSC_1285

  • If athletes cannot make the class time they are reserved for, canceling of reservation is a must.
  • All athletes need to be relatively warmed up by the start time of your class.
  • Warm up using the designated area until class starts.
  • Equipment should be cared for and put away correctly, after all other athletes have finished their workoutDSC_1215
  • DO NOT walk near another athlete lifting. Wait until they are done to pass.
  • Record weights and scores into Wodify; doing this will track individuals progress and help to figure out which weight you should be using.
  • Finish post workout cool down (mobility) within 15 minutes of your class finishing. This will ensure the current classes focus. All other “extra” activities can be done during Open Gym.
  • Work hard, forget about the problems of your day, and give it your all, every day.
  • Do not cheat. Do every rep, with solid technique, no matter the time it takes. You only cheat yourself of the opportunity toDSC_0945 become a better athlete and person. There is no honor in cheating, what joy is there in a victory you didn’t earn? If needed, scale the movement to something sustainable.
  • Be patient. Accidents, injuries, and lack of progress usually come as a result of impatience. Don’t be greedy. Slow down. Ask questions. Ask for help. Upward progression in strength, speed, and ability will come.
  • Be welcoming and supportive. That is who we are.

03.28.2014

Main – CrossFit

Warm-up

Warm-up (No Measure)

4 Rounds:
:15 Dead Lift
:15 Front Squat
:15 Mountain Climber
:15 Jump Squat
-Then-
4 Rounds:
:15 Plank
:15 Superman
:15 Side Plank R
:15 Side Plank L

Weightlifting

Turkish Get Up (10:00 Practice)

Metcon

CrossFit Games Open 14.5 (Time)

For Time:
21 Thruster, 95#/65#
21 Bar Facing Burpees
18 Thruster, 95#/65#
18 Bar Facing Burpees
15 Thruster, 95#/65#
15 Bar Facing Burpees
12 Thruster, 95#/65#
12 Bar Facing Burpees
9 Thruster, 95#/65#
9 Bar Facing Burpees
6 Thruster, 95#/65#
6 Bar Facing Burpees
3 Thruster, 95#/65#
3 Bar Facing Burpees

02.11.2014

WARM-UP:  5:00 AMRAP
          5 Push Ups
          10 Ring/Body Rows
          15 Squats
STRENGTH:  6 Rounds: :20on/:10off:
           1.) Dips
           2.) C2B (Chest to Bar)
WOD:  10:00 AMRepsAP:
      120 Double Unders/240 Singles
      60 Lateral Burpees
      30 T2B (toes to bar)

07.24.2013 [wednesday]

Max-Effort Lift:  20:00 Bench
                  warm up: 10@bar, 8-10@45%, 5-10@65%
                  work: 5@75%, 3@85%, 1+@95%
                  back off: 10@50-60%
Assistant Movement: Banded Tricep Push Downs
                    1x close to failure
                    1x failure
Pulling Superset:  3 Rounds:
                   8-10 Supine Body Rows
                   12-15 Banded Pull Aparts (BPA)
WOD:  FOR TIME:
      5-4-3-2-1 Muscle Ups
      10-8-6-4-2 HSPU (Handstand Push ups)
      *alternating movements